Coming Soon to Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center...


Auspicious Triple Sheep (Herald Square). Digital image. City Center DC. N.p., n.d.Web. 11 Oct. 2017. 

Auspicious Triple Sheep
2013 
Baked enamel on steel plates, integral granite base

Hung Yi
Taiwanese, b. Taichung, 1970

 

Works from the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

 

Marseille
1960 (cast 1963)
Bronze

Cèsar
French, b. Marseilles, 1921-1998

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

Perhaps because of an early life spent in the poverty of an Italian neighborhood in Marseilles, César felt more at home in the industrial setting of a scrap yard than in an artist's studio. Primarily concerned with abstract forms, he turned to cheap scrap metal to create his often provocative art. The shape of Marseille, named for the seaport town where he was born, is suggestive of the sail of a boat in the harbor. Tiny shells and other coastal debris appear imbedded in the heart of the sail. The original Marseille, in the collection of the Hirshhorn, consists of numerous pieces of welded scrap metal. This bronze was made from a mold of the original and bears the evidence of its ancestry of welded steel construction.

 

 

Standing Nude
Date unknown
Bronze

Nelli Bar
American, b. Cologne, Germany, 1904 - 2001

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

 

 

 

 

Hand
ca. 1959-1964
Bronze

Sorel Etrog
Canadian, b. Jassy, Romania, 1933

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Iyengar
1978
Bronze

Robert Engman
American, b. Pennsylvania 1927

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1979

Named after the Indian Yoga master B.K.S. Iyengar, the sculpture has been carefully placed at the intersection of two of the Garden’s long grassy hallways. Visitors have commented that the work appears to be an optical puzzle because from each new vantage point new shapes appear. Its wonderfully dynamic geometric form twists together circles and a square to create an Escher-like quality to the bronze.

 

 

   

 

 

The Bird, Uranus II
1957
Bronze

Etienne Hajdu
French, b. Romania, 1907-1996

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

Of Hungarian descent, Hajdu moved to Paris in 1927, where he studied classical sculpture and painting. He quickly developed an interest in contemporary art and launched himself into the study of figurative and abstract sculpture. Self taught, he worked with a variety of materials including slate, aluminum, copper, bronze, marble and onyx. He continued to draw which allowed him the opportunity to experiment with light and space. The Bird, an excellent example of his work, demonstrates the smooth and elegant form of his sculptures. The shape of the piece and the web-like pattern of lines suggest a creature poised to take flight.

 

 

Curved Form: Bryher II
1961

Bronze

Dame Barbara Hepworth
British, b. Wakefield, England, 1903-1975

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Bequest, 1981

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl With Braids

1950
Bronze

Gerhard Marcks
German, b. Berlin, 1889-1981

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

Marcks, primarily recognized as a sculptor, was also a talented ceramicist and designer.  His work was banned by the Nazis during World War II.  The many pieces he had stored in his studio were destroyed in bombing raids and those he had secretly hidden were plundered and ruined.  After the war, he was commissioned to create numerous memorials and public monuments across Germany.  In his ceramics and woodcuts, his sculptural techniques are recognizable in the classic figures and crisp lines.  Girl With Braids, exemplifies Marcks' ability to create a clean modern look in the face and form, yet convey a complex emotional statement. 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monumental Standing Cardinal
1958
Bronze

Giacomo Manzu
Italian, b. Bergamo, 1908-1991

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

 

Manzu grew up immersed in the imagery and patriarchy of Italian Catholicism which is reflected in much of his art. Beginning in the late 1930s and continuing for several decades, he produced numerous works featuring standing and seated cardinals. Monumental Standing Cardinal is not intended to portray a specific person, but rather to convey the strength and authority of the church and its centuries long history. The sculpture is classic in its subject and posture, yet possesses a modern approach to the expression. Note the curious transformation from the wood-like base to the metal sculpture. Set amidst the tall trees of Annmarie Garden, the Cardinal is part of nature's cathedral.

 

Torso
Date unknown
Bronze

Frederick Charles Shrady
American, b. Eastview, New York, 1907 - 1990

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenberg Variations
1974
Cor-ten Steel

Jules Olitski
American, b. Snovsk, Russia, 1922

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Museum Purchase 1977

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resting
1965
Bronze

Paul Suttman
American, b. Enid, Oklahoma, 1933-1993

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Wind: Stainless Steel Monument
1966
Stainless Steel

Attilio Pierelli

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joesph H. Hirshhorn, 1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six Number Two
1967
Stainless steel with wire cable

Kenneth Snelson
American, b. Pendleton, Oregon, 1927

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1980

Snelson relies on the opposing forces of tension and compression, a relationship he terms "tensegrity," to lend stability and strength to his creations. Fascinated by the structure of weaving patterns and the structure of the atom, his work reflects his appreciation for the complex network of forces that comprise the universe. Six Number Two, like his other pieces appears rather delicate, but is surprisingly strong. Snelson's work is noted for this apparent contradiction; they appear precarious, yet the use of modern materials coupled with his precise designs results in an elegantly sturdy structure.

"The wires and metal tubes are my keyboard, on which I play my three-dimensional spatial game. It's like playing a violin." - Kenneth Snelson

 

 

Circular Reflection
1972
Painted steel

Yehiel Shemi
Israel, b. Haifa, 1922

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1980

Shemi created his first pieces in stone and wood while living on a kibbutz in Israel. Employed as a construction worker on the kibbutz, he began to create abstract works using industrial tools and scrap materials. In Circular Reflection, a fine example of his work, the smaller of the two round elements was cut from the larger, resulting in a self-reflective component to the piece. The large, angled armature lends balance and stability to the overall structure. As the structure is viewed from different vantage points, interesting shadows and shapes appear and disappear, like the changing reflection of a moving object.

 

 

Big Skull II 
Bronze

Jack Zajac
American, b. Youngstown, Ohio 1929

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H Hirshhorn, 1966

 

 

 

Daimaru X
1978
Steel

Michael Todd
American, b. Omaha, Nebraska, 1935

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, by exchange from Michael Todd, Los Angeles, January 15, 1980

 

 

 

Shembo
1983
Welded steel

James Wolfe
American, b. New York City, 1944

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Purchased from James Wolfe, New York, 1984

 

 

 

 

 

Seated Woman

1975
Bronze

Francisco Zúñiga
Mexican, b. San Jose, Costa Rica, 1913 - 1998

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Bequest, 1981

 

Traveler's Column 1962
Bronze

Arnoldo Pomodoro
Italian, b. Marciano, 1926

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph Hirshhorn, 1966

 

 

WORKS FORMERLY ON EXHIBIT AT ANNMARIE

 

 

Dragan 
1973-1974
laminated acrylic

Vasa Velizar Michich
American, b. Yugoslavia


Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Frederick R. Weisman, Beverly Hills, CA, 1974

 

 

 

Open Suspense
1968
Cor-ten steel

Menashe Kadishman
Israeli, b. Tel Aviv, 1932

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1972

 

The top two elements of this work, a rectangle and a half ring, seem gently balanced on top, in opposition to its massive cor-ten steel construction. Looking down the hallway from Open Suspense, the visitor is afforded a spectacular view of After Iyengar.

Africa
Cor-ten Steel

Isaac Witkin

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden,
Smithsonian Institution

 

Squatting Woman with Shawl
1971
Bronze

Francisco Zúñiga
Mexican, b. San Jose, Costa Rica, 1913 - 1998

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of José Tasende, 1976

Works from the National Gallery of Art

   
   
   
   
   

Works from Private Collections

 

 

Potomac Rhythm
1979
Georgia Marble

Lee Aks
American, b. Bethesda, Maryland, 1946

On loan from the artist

For years, Aks’ piece, Potomac Rhythm, sat in a back lobby of the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Virginia, but at Annmarie Garden it has been given a setting worthy of its form. Carved from a several thousand pound chunk of white Georgia marble, his piece undulates like a flowing river. The combination of multiplying ripples and smooth satiny surfaces embodies the varying nature of the Potomac River. Set amid a leafy backdrop, the black-veined white marble glows under the sheltering tree canopy.

 

 


 

 

 Equation
1999
Bronze

Andrew Baxter
American, b. New York City, 1957

On loan from the artist

Baxter’s shield-like bronze piece called Equation sits propped on a tripod in the woods, as if the artist imagines the work as a bronze painting. Indeed, Baxter is known as a superb conservator able to create luminous patinas on old bronze sculpture. With Equation he has “painted” his bronze with the loveliest brown and copper tones. Baxter is fascinated with the idea of infinity and imagines his work as a depiction of something at the microscopic level, a limitless world where time and space meld.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
   
   
   
   
   

 

Calendar

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Upcoming

Saturday,Oct28th,2017

Monday,Oct30th,2017

Saturday,Nov4th,2017

Friday,Nov10th,2017

Sunday,Nov12th,2017

Thursday,Nov23rd,2017

Friday,Nov24th,2017

Saturday,Dec2nd,2017

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